Tag Archives: Paint

Salute 2014 – Dreadball


The Floating Citadel denizens made their annual pilgrimage to Salute – more on that in another post; to cut a long story short I am now a proud owner of Dreadball – a game I have been meaning to get my hands on for over a year.

In true servitob style, the test minis were up and painted within a matter of hours of the box being opened. The technique used here is apparently called “Greyscale Washing”, if any of you googlespiders want to know more details I can point you in the right direction.

The aim was to do something very quick to make the game playable in the shortest amount of time. Mantic stuff is so cheap that if I ever miraculously got enough quality time for actually giving a damn about multi-layer highlights and all that nonsense then I could simply buy new teams. For now, I consider 2.4 seconds a reasonable amount of time to spend per model.

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I’ve also read through the rules – it looks like a very promisingly fun game!

Super Dungeon Explore Deeproot Druid


SDE Druid

Whilst looking for inspiration I stumbled upon this fine piece of work.

This is one of the best paint jobs I have seen in a long time; it took me a few glances to notice that it was actually a pair of miniatures and not a piece of drawn artwork. I especially love the non-metallic gold work on the bear, I hope you would agree!

The source can be found here: http://hard-liners.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/super-dungeon-explore-part-3.html

Super Dungeon Explore Royal Paladin


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It’s been a while since I picked up a paintbrush so recently I spent a bit of time painting this up.

It all started last week when a friend a I went to Games Lore. SDE is a good fun game, so I was planning to pick it up at some point. I’d hate to be in the predicament of it going out of print and then having to fork out to pick up a shoddy copy on fleabay when the kids are old enough to play it. We got a tour of the place and I bought a copy for myself.

It’s been good fun getting back into painting. Normally I paint really fast using a black undercoat. This was the first time in about twenty years where I’ve painted off a white undercoat. The differences are startling. With a white undercoat the colours are much more vivid, however brush precision is essential as you have to cover every part of the mini to get a decent result. To aid this I used some flow enhancer which helped a lot. With a black undercoat colours are much more muted and often require several layers to get the correct colour, however any parts you don’t paint simply look shaded. Obviously all you long standing and reading googlespiders know all this already as there are loads of decent articles on mini painting out there on the internet, but nothing beats licking that brush tip and getting stuck in!

Experiments In Painting Part 2 – Wehrmacht Warhammer 40k Ork Boyz


Yesterday’s post left you googlespiders with a bit of a cliffhanger as to what happened to the other half of my box of ork boyz, well now you know! I got busy with the brush, cracked out the Flames of War paintset and churned out these Heer-os!

This could actually be quite a good army theme, especially if one can get one’s grubby paws on some ork sized stahlhelms and orky balkenkreuzen. Sometimes though it’s one thing to get an idea and do some testers, and a whole world of difference to actually get the project to table. Heck that could take all week!

The Devlan Mud of Drybrushing?


Following on from my last post I am getting on with constructing my 15mm Second World War force. For the first time ever rather than plunging straight in with sprays and Army Painter dips I’ve been trawling the likes of Youtube for new and interesting painting techniques. Obviously servitob style rapid speed painting is still the order of the day but I’m always willing to integrate new ideas. The Tamiya Weathering Master was one product which I liked the look of. So far I’m really impressed. It’s a powdery type material that comes with it’s own applicator which you use to dust the stuff on. It works like a really simple and effective drybrush technique without all that brush wiping hassle.

Another technique I have been trying is the use of window cleaner in ink washes. I’ve been using vallejo umber shade wash and diluting it with window cleaner to various ratios. So far I’ve found that for vehicles a mix of about 1:1 wash to window cleaner is about right. The science behind this is that the detergent in the window cleaner lowers the surface tension in the water based ink allowing it to flow better. I once added some washing up liquid to a waterslide at a kid’s birthday party to obtain this effect. The kids were loving it as they approached warp speed much to the horror of the mums present. Geek dad is awesome! The water molecules in the ink bunch up a lot less easily and so will tend to slide off flat surfaces and into recesses. This is important on large flat vehicle surfaces. Window cleaner makes a good detergent because it is transparent. Washing up liquid would also work but the artificial colouration might add an extra sheen to your model.

So I’ve finished my first two test models using these new found techniques. They are by The Plastic Soldier Company, including decals. They are in the photo at the top of this post, see what you think!

Chaos Space Marines by J, Aged 11


J is eleven years old at the moment, and when he’s not too busy doing homework or getting into mischief with his siblings he occasionally joins the 6InchMove crew for a bit of 40k. He has been collecting an horde of spikey boys for a few months now, and has been gradually learning the arts of gaming and miniature painting.

Here are his first finished models:

Nice Work J!