Tag Archives: Blood Angels

Happy Easter – See you at Warhammer World


We at 6 Inch Move would like to wish all of our reader (yes the singular was intentional) a very happy Easter, whether you are Christian, agnostic, Pastafarian or even a devotee of the Imperial Cult. While this will mean a break from work for many of us I’d like you all to spare a thought for the Easter Bunny, torn away from his family and forced to distribute eggs to various kids while braving the Chav filled streets of our respective countries.

Your favourite blogging team (yes us) will be out and about over this period with the entire content generating machine appearing at the northern nerd-mecca that is Warhammer World Easter Monday.

If you see a bunch of late-twenties/early-thirties slim and attractive males, that won’t be us. But if you hear all kinds of geek-tastic comments and generally derisive chatter from people that clearly don’t fit in with the Skaven like teeming hordes of pre-teens you have likely found us. We will also have a table full of Fat Bloke burgers so watch out for that clue.We will no doubt be counting the number of Blood Angels defectees also.

Whether we will be availing ourselves of the opportunity to grab a gaming table and indulge is yet to be decided. If you’re not scared of going up to strangers then you can try to find us out.

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Codex Creep – Not a Latin Venereal Disease


Servitob tried to steal my thunder, but I shall carry on regardless of his efforts to deprive me of quality posting material. I don’t think anyone can really argue that Games Workshop is the largest and most well-known miniatures gaming company globally. Most of us grew up playing their games before we branched out into the busy niche hobby we call our own. Yet despite this bid for global domination there is a facet of their hobby that continues to provide me with more than a modicum of amusement. Servitob touched on this this morning when posting about the Blood Angels, I am not going to be pigeon-holing my acerbic comments to just a single release though.

The easiest way to sum up this phenomena is the “My Dad can beat up your Dad” axiom.

I don’t know whether this is down to the main demographic that GWs games are aimed for, there are many others whirlpools out there in Internet land where you can read about the trend for marketing Space Marinehammer 40,000 at an ever youthful target market, thereby increasing the possibility of immaturity within the hobby. Be that as it may, you cannot normally strike up a conversation with someone regarding Warhammer ( the one with Elves or the one with Space Elves) without eventually someone piping up with ” Well my unit X (Dad) can beat up your unit X (Dad)”… and this will go back and forth in a never-ending death spiral of paternal combat as comparisons go back and forth like a game of Top Trumps.

I am in no way suggesting that this is present only in the product of the beast of Nottingham, I am sure these conversations do occur with their competitors, however, I tend to find communities for other games to be more mature, perhaps that is due to the fact that we grow up with GW and then move on to other games as we find ourselves distanced from the core group the erstwhile Sherrif is trying to appeal to. I know that we can get very attached to our forces and we want them to be good and come out on top in the hypothetical scraps we enact upon our dining tables. Yet I believe there is another reason for the heated fratricidal debates and this is where Servitobs observations come in… the humble Codex or Army Book.

In every other game I play the forces for the games are all released together, in the rulebook, perhaps being personified as the Robin Hood to our dastardly money-grabbing Sherrif. GW release a rulebook every few years for which we fork over some hard-earned green and then wait eagerly (in no way do we wait patiently) for an updated army book, thus in an infinite feedback loop of rules/army book recycling that continually parts us from our lovely money that our wives would rather see spent on gifts for themselves. No other games system that I see in mainstream production goes with this approach. I imagine the only reason that the northern behemoth gets away with it is due to their size as a company.

Then we also have the fact that each book ends up written by a single chap, often with help from others but there is one name that stands out as the main author of the book, they will also almost inevitably be connected in some way to that army. Rather than having a development team look at the whole thing and work together, they lock a chap who loves his army into the development “closet” and months later out he comes with a fanboy style uberforce ready to decimate all that stand before it. While this may be a very whimsical look at how they do things it may not be far from the truth. Each army book does tend to be written by someone who harks on about how good they are, possibly not the best person to trust with delivering a balanced final product. There is also GWs much maligned playtesting procedure or apparent lack of one, here at 6 Inch Move we readily believe that each army is tested against Space Marines, one of the Horde armies and maybe the Tau, job done, go home, release book to market.

Judging by the quality of armies picked in White Dwarf battle reports Games Workshop’s own staff might not be best placed to deliver what little testing is done. Thus each new book is released to the cries of Internet doom-mongers decrying the dairy based nature of this heinous abomination, how it will break the game and deliver up the spawn of beelzebub himself upon the gaming tables of the nation. As of yet I have not heard of anyone spontaneously combusting due to the brokeness of an army, no, not even Daemons players!

However, once this all calms down the next release is on the horizon and the nerdrage starts again. I know that if GW were to release their armies in the same format as other companies we’d be paying £100 for the core rulebook I believe that at the least they really need to have more than one guy put his name to the Codex rules writing. Although the maxim “too many cooks spoil the broth” I think a few more people lending their talents would be better than the current “lone pillock cocks up an army book” that we have right now. I too will be looking forward to seeing what happens when Servitob fires up his Edward Cullen marines, I might even get him some paint effects that sparkle when they catch the sun. My only hope is that GW try to reign in the creep. Other people manage to crank out balanced and enjoyable products and while I do still enjoy my forays into either Hammer universe, there is still vast room for improvement compared to the competition.

Space Marines: Blood Angels – The Codex That Breaks 40k?


I’m sure every player has heard of it, a phenomenon called ‘Codex Creep’. Whether it is actually true or not is a mystery, but it goes something like this: Every new codex is slightly better than the last. The cynics say it’s so Games Workshop can sell a load of new models. The moaners moan that it is soooo unfair that now their army is obsolete. The people who welcome the new codex are generally the ones who play the army in question, and insist that it’s perfectly balanced and fluffy. Codex: Blood Angels however has caused some controversy in that it is supposedly very overpowered and unbalanced.

I have heard some of the rumours, and even got a chance to look at the hallowed tome. And yes, it does seem a trifle ludicrous in places. I get the impression that the troops are the same cost as the standard marines but are slightly better. Same with vehicles, slightly better. So expect to see a lot of marine players suddenly turn red. Now I know that these statements may invoke some Blood Angel fanboyism. But fanboys, ask youselves – do you truly want a codex which is so overpowered that suddenly your lovely fluffy red marine obsession becomes a group activity? Do you want hordes of Blood Angels power players ruining your immersion? If it is truly as good as rumours would have us believe then potentially most Space Marine players (which seem to be most 40k players anyway) could suddenly be buying red spray paint.

Personally though, I put very little stock in rumours. Sure, some codexes are more powered than others. I’m not sure powered is the word though, maybe easier to play is more appropriate. Most tournament players pack plenty of AP3 so Dante and chums won’t be a great threat to the pro-players. Most weekend warriors such as myself simply lack the will to field a broken army. I don’t think our gaming circle would be as quite as friendly if things started getting cut-throat relying on imbalanced mechanics. A lot of people simply lack the skills and experience to properly use an overpowered army anyway, and the dice tend to level the playing field to an extent.

That said, my red spraypaint and book is on order, just out of curiousity obviously!

Space Hulk – Mission 2 Review


After many weeks of waiting the day finally arrived that we broke out the boards and setup the rather enormous map for Space Hulk’s second mission, the adequately named “Exterminate”. It took Servitob and myself around twenty minutes in order to actually set the board up as it uses most of the pieces from the set and it’s lucky that our dining table extends as we needed the space to accommodate all the floor plan. In this mission, like the first one, you have a single squad of Marines, however, this time you get a Chainfist, an Assault Cannon and the Sergeant with Thunder Hammer and Storm Shield rather than a third Power Fist, the Heavy Flamer and the Power Sword Sergeant. Although there are  a lot of corridors there are also a number of rooms and the players take it in turns placing one of the Terminators in any of the rooms (unless previously occupied) facing in any direction. This inevitably leads to the Marine player putting his dudes down in the most advantageous positions while the Genestealer player tries to fux with them.

In terms of the Genestealer menace all the “2” blips are removed and you make a shuffled stack of all the “1” and “3” blips, you get two a turn but nothing to start the game with. We did our usual of one player is Marines and then switch sides and refight the battle. This can mean that the person playing the Genestealers second may be granted a better insight into how to win, but I will not excuse myself like that, I had the dice curse where the vast majority of my rolls were a 3 or less and that is never good.

First time through I was the ‘Stealers, the Marines have to get within 6 squares of each of the 2 areas that the Genestealers can enter (thereby splitting the squad up) or wipe out everything that comes at them. Genestealers simply need to kill all Humans. So, first time we play through and I stand off the Assault Cannon for most of the game. I manage to dispatch the Space Marine Sergeant who is hovering at the top of the board supported by a Storm Bolter armed squadmate. I tried to move a massive swarm this way and then catch the others from behind while amassing another force to their front. Let’s just say it didn’t work, or it could have done if Servitob wasn’t rolling 5’s or 6’s all the time with alarming regularity. I lost wave after wave of aliens without even getting close. Every time I managed to jam the overwatching Storm Bolters he’d always managed to pull out the counter that would allow him to unjam it before blasting more Genestealer to redecorate the walls. I lost by virtue of the fact all the Stealers were wiped out. My mistake was not throwing bodies at the Assault Cannon, if I had done this then it would have depleted its ammo faster and I’d have had a change to get in there and cause some damage.

When we switched roles things went very different. My own Sergeant saw off some aliens in close combat before getting whooped while Servitob learnt from my mistakes and threw bodies at the Assault Cannon, it ran out of ammo and my very first shot after reloading was 3 2’s which caused the thing to explode killing the Marine… pretty much summed up my day. After that it was a war of attrition that I was destined to lose. I jammed, had no Command Points to unjam, or threw dice so low things walked through a hail of fire and straight into combat. These things happen but it was still getting tense towards the end as a single Terminator remained gunning down Genestealers before finally being overwhelmed.

Bring on Mission 3…

Space Hulk – Mission 1 Review


Due to the fact that I have misplaced the cable that connects my camera to my PC I couldn’t take any photos of the Space Hulk board with its completely unpainted miniatures last night. As Servitob has already mentioned we finally managed to give the thing a go. I’d almost forgotten that I had the game considering it arrived, got the stuff punched out of the card stock and the minis assembled within a couple days and the with the chaos of my wife going back to work after the school holidays it got “tidied” away onto a seat under the dining table. Malifaux then dropped through the letterbox and I’ve spent the past week reading through those rules and enjoying the world come to life as I’ve done so. But I digress, this is another Space Hulk post.

The mission book is composed of twelve missions that make up the campaign, it was obvious therefore that we’d start with mission 1 in order to ease us into the game. The map is mainly corridors with only a few rooms at intersections, the mission is affectionately called “Suicide Mission”. You get one squad of the Blood Angels Terminators against the ravening horde of Genestealers, the aim being that you need to use the limited ammo Heavy Flamer to torch the room that is furthest away on the map. You’ve only got 6 shots with the thing so conserving it until that optimal time is just one of the things you’re balancing. You get the Heavy Flamer dude, a Sergeant with Power Sword and 3 dudes armed with Storm Bolters and Power Fists. We played the mission through twice with Servitob commanding the Emperor’s Finest first and then swapping over.

The first time we played (me commanding the alien menace) was a victory to the Marines, i was afflicted with more than a fair share of 1 “blips” (when Genestealers enter play they are represented by a blip token which can be between 1 and 3 actual Genestealers). Being only the second game ever of Space Hulk I also ended up learning respect for Overwatch as my horde of single ‘Stealers got picked off as they were forced to march into a hail of fire to get anywhere near their quarry. I only managed to off one Terminator, it was, however, the Sergeant which meant that Servitob could not repick his Command Point token at the beginning of his turn anymore, although it didn’t seem to really hinder him. After I had collected what I thought was a solid force I marched into combat and got wasted, the Blood Angels then walked through opened the door to the objective room and bathed it in the flames from the Heavy Flamer. Good game and I reckon that I should have held off my attack for another turn or two in order to get more numbers, hindsight is wonderful after all.

We switched sides and I deployed the Marines different to Servitob and likewise he did with his blips. Playing from the other side was interesting as you watch those blips slowly encroach upon your limited forces not knowing what quantity of horrors they contain. Having learnt the value of Overwatch I used it on a couple of guys per turn, usually using my Command Point allocation in order to do so. I lost a Marine early on (protecting the entry room from a Genestealer entryway and another covering the chap who bought it. However, the single most impressive guy was my Sergeant, he gunned down numerous aliens as he led the charge through the Hulk then he sat himself on Guard (the melee version of Overwatch introduced in this new addition) and saw off every single beast that tried to kill him.

Considering that you kill a Genestealer in shooting on a 6 you’d be surprised how often that number appears when you’re rolling two dice. It does remind you of the evac scene in Aliens when Vasquez yells out “Let’s ROCK!” and all hell breaks loose. Eventually as I was getting very worried that I was going to fail I pulled a 6 out of the cup for my turns command points and then checked the required movements I’d need. My Sergeant gunned down the first Genestealer in his way and used the rest of his moves to charge into the oncoming horde, I then spent all my Heavy Flamer guys action points and then all the Command Points by turning up the final corridor, opening the last door and then razing the objective room. It was an all or nothing move for me and it paid off, the tension was palpable at this point, at least one of my Marines was going to get it in the face if I took another turn and the numbers were escalating while mine were quickly dwindling. Luckily the superstar Sergeant showed why he’s the leader with impressive combats all the way. We managed to play through that mission twice in just over an hour and it was a blast.

The second mission’s map is a lot bigger and I think we may be cracking it open tonight to carry on from where we left off yesterday. As I’ve already given a quick overview and review of the rules, now that I’ve played it I can give it a heartfelt 10/10 in terms of gameplay. As the Marines player you really feel up against it, managing your limited resources in order to do something which when you do, feels suitably heroic, especially when you can see the odds stacking against you. The fact that everything you need to play comes in the box is a bonus considering what you need for all other GW games and I am very happy I spent the money and pre-ordered, this is going to be taken out and used at every available opportunity. There were no rules issues or points of contention. We looked up things as and when needed but really, I don’t think (other than the specific weapons rules) we’ll be diving into the rulebook very often. It plays smooth and fast and if anyone can find a copy and is wondering whether to take the plunge, go for it, you won’t regret it!

(For some reason this post was sitting in my Drafts when it should have been published Monday morning).