We Won!


I suppose I should explain the title of this post.  A few of you may remember a post I wrote about a year ago showing off some models that I had painted in my first excursion into historical wargaming.  I had always wanted to get into this genre, but had never got around to it until recently.

My local independent retailer & associated gaming club started to organise and run a campaign based around the Civil War (that would be the English Civil War in case you were wondering); it looked good and I decided to get involve.  As you probably have guessed by now the campaign has reached a conclusion – we won!  I was playing the part of one of the Scot’s Covenanter; namely Archibald Campbell.  The campaign was based upon the First Civil War starting with the initial outbreak of war between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians.  At this stage of the Civil Wars the Scottish government (dominated by the Covenanters) sided with the English Parliament, and so in the campaign the three Covenanter players fought against the King.  For the campaign victory conditions were set (including the capture of certain territories and certain special characters), and then the games begun.  A few days ago the Royalist surrendered unconditionally.  To be honest their situation was’t good.  With about 9 players on each side we had managed to capture the King and the Royalist war time leader Prince Rupert.  We had captured the main port of Bristol, along with much of the Royalist territory.  They still had most of Wales and Cornwall, but they had lost all but two of their cities; namely Shrewsbury and Worcester and they were both under siege (yours truly was pounding the walls of Shrewsbury).  If they had lost these, and there was no way of relieving them in time, then all of their armies would have been out of supply and it would have been pretty much game over.  So as it happens they chose to surrender.  So WOOHOO!

For me the whole thing has been great fun, despite my many defeats as I learnt how the system works (most notably to Montrose).  For the campaign we started off using Warlord Games’ Black Powder rules.  This is a rules set based on the musket era.  Once Warlord heard of what we were doing they started working on a Pike & Shotte era rules set that we then play tested.  We went through a couple of revisions and helped to provide valuable feedback to Warlord.  Our club and independent store even got a mention in the recently released Pike & Shotte rulebook, which was cool.  That was another first for me; play testing.  I’ve been meaning to write a few comments about these rules, and I will get around to that soon.  For now here’s a few pictures of the army I used.

I will be the first to admit that they aren’t my finest painted models, but when you think that I painted most of the army in just 3 weeks, they’re not that bad.  The army consists of;

  • General Archibald Campbell plus battalion commanders for the 8 battalions my army is divided into
  • 5 Pike Blocks with 2 Musket Wings each
  • 4 units of Scot’s Lancers
  • 2 Cavalry units
  • 2 Highlander units (note the one showing off his buttocks)
  • 1 Skirmisher unit
  • 9 Frame Guns
  • 6 Sakers
  • 1 Mortar
That works out as a total of 372 models (if you count the cannons & crews separately).

I do have a couple of units that I never finished painting in time (though as I have them I’ll still paint them up and put them in the army).  Future plans for the army?  The club is looking at doing the Second Civil War, plus friendly games.  Overall it has been a great experience for me.  Glory to Scotland!

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